Empty Words Are A Never Ending Trend

Please feel free to read and give advice

I haven’t written down how I’m feeling in a while and I hope I don’t get half through this and then press cancel.

I’m currently still in the middle of deciding next year. I was originally leaning way more towards GA than Ball State. But then I went up there for a visit with some friends and it reminded me that I can start the college life ASAP. It’s easy. Care free mostly. And I’d jump into at least one of my major classes, which I’m thankful to have found something I’m relatively passionate about. Just writing this out gets me excited. So why don’t I just choose ball state? Because blood is thicker than water. My other choice is my father. My father that hasn’t seen me grow up into a young woman. My father that only has a small idea of my character and ideology because we haven’t lived together in 6 years. My father that has heart problems and surprisingly has made it this far, far enough to see my graduate and potentially have me live with him. I love him more than anything. So why don’t I just choose to live in GA for a year with him?

Do you see the predicament I’m in?

Besides that, I’m doing okay. I’m excited for prom. There’s still time for it to turn out the way I want it to, but that’s why I’m trying to create options that are just as good so my hopes aren’t crushed all that bad. As long as I’m with my friends having a good time, and I’m looking damn good in that dress I don’t care. Only 46 more days. Only about 2 more weeks to think about this decision. Only about 3 more months with my friends before we all move off somewhere for school or forever.

My heart, my mind, and my body are doing okay. I’m feeling more together everyday. I’m thankful to say that because I know a lot of people can’t right now.


More deep sighing. And one more just for fun. I liked this weekend. There’s a lot to do.


theatlantic:

1 in 68 Children Now Has of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Why?

Rates of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are not creeping up so much as leaping up. New numbers just released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that one in 68 children now has a diagnosis of ASD—a 30 percent increase in just two years. In 2002, about one in 150 children was considered autistic and in 1991 the figure was one in 500.
The staggering increase in cases of ASD should raise more suspicion in the medical community about its misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis than it does. Promoting early screening for autism is imperative. But, is it possible that the younger in age a child is when professionals screen for ASD—especially its milder cases—the greater the risk that a slow-to-mature child will be misperceived as autistic, thus driving the numbers up?
The science stacks up in favor of catching and treating ASD earlier because it leads to better outcomes. Dr. Laura Schreibman, who directs the Autism Intervention Research Program at the University of California, San Diego embodies the perspective of most experts when she says, “Psychologists need to advise parents that the ‘wait-and-see’ approach is not appropriate when ASD is expected. Delaying a diagnosis can mean giving up significant gains of intervention that have been demonstrated before age six.”
Read more. [Image: David Goldman/AP]
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theatlantic:

1 in 68 Children Now Has of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Why?

Rates of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are not creeping up so much as leaping up. New numbers just released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that one in 68 children now has a diagnosis of ASD—a 30 percent increase in just two years. In 2002, about one in 150 children was considered autistic and in 1991 the figure was one in 500.

The staggering increase in cases of ASD should raise more suspicion in the medical community about its misdiagnosis and overdiagnosis than it does. Promoting early screening for autism is imperative. But, is it possible that the younger in age a child is when professionals screen for ASD—especially its milder cases—the greater the risk that a slow-to-mature child will be misperceived as autistic, thus driving the numbers up?

The science stacks up in favor of catching and treating ASD earlier because it leads to better outcomes. Dr. Laura Schreibman, who directs the Autism Intervention Research Program at the University of California, San Diego embodies the perspective of most experts when she says, “Psychologists need to advise parents that the ‘wait-and-see’ approach is not appropriate when ASD is expected. Delaying a diagnosis can mean giving up significant gains of intervention that have been demonstrated before age six.”

Read more. [Image: David Goldman/AP]